Research

What the data is telling us

We have compiled a range of research that demonstrates the difference that your contributions are making to programs such as beyond 3:30, our successful after-school program for middle-school kids, and also research that demonstrates how support for other programs could make a huge difference to many children across Toronto. Find out more below..

beyond 3:30
beyond 3:30: A Multi-Purpose After-School Program for Inner-City Middle Schools. Phase 4 Evaluation. December 2015 

This report is the Phase IV Evaluation of beyond 3:30, an extended multi-faceted after-school program designed specifically for middle school students in high-needs communities.

With research grants from the Ministry of Education, the TDSB’s Research Department undertook a four–phase study to evaluate the program for both formative (to inform practices) and summative (to assess effectiveness) purposes. The Phase IV Evaluation is the final phase of this multi-year research.


Find out more about our beyond 3:30 program by clicking here.
beyond 3:30: A Multi-Purpose After-School Program for Inner-City Middle Schools. Phase 3 Evaluation. November 2014.  
With the continuing funding support from the Ministry of Education, this Phase III research focuses on an in-depth examination of why and how beyond 3:30 has made significant impacts on adolescents as well as their families in high-needs communities. Many of the observable impacts identified in Phase I and II Evaluations were confirmed in this Phase III explanatory research with the use of both qualitative and quantitative data. Even more importantly, this study has explored a number of unanticipated but important spin-off benefits, which were found to have borne great implications for the participants’ well-being and future success.

 

 Find out more about our beyond 3:30 program by clicking here.
beyond 3:30: A Multi-Purpose After-School Program for Inner-City Middle Schools. Phase 2 Report. September 2013.  
This Phase 2 evaluation is a continuation of a Phase 1 study on our innovative, multi-purpose after-school program, called beyond 3:30. This program keeps middle school kids in Toronto’s high-risk areas safe and engaged between the hours of 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. every school day. The Phase 2 report presents the findings of beyond 3:30‘s program components, its impacts, challenges, solutions and next steps.  Find out more about our beyond 3:30 program by clicking here.
 beyond 3:30: A Multi-Purpose After-School Program for Inner-City Middle Schools. Phase 1 Report. March 2012.  
 beyond 3:30 keeps nearly 1,000 middle school kids in Toronto’s high-risk areas safe and engaged between the hours of 3:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. every school day. This report presents the findings of beyond 3:30‘s program components, its impacts, challenges, solutions and next steps  Find out more about our beyond 3:30 program by clicking here.
Student Nutrition
JAMA Pediatrics: Continued Promise of School Breakfast Programs for Improving Academic Outcomes. January 2015.
Researchers at Tufts University provides evidence about the importance of school breakfasts. Their study used a large sample of elementary schools to examine outcomes of a Breakfast in the Classroom intervention as a strategy to increase participation in the School Breakfast Program and several key academic outcomes. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
JAMA Pediatrics: Quality and Cost of Student Lunches Brought From Home. January 2015.  
Research report indicates that lunches brought from home compared unfavorably with current National School Lunch Program guidelines. Strategies are needed to improve the nutritional quality of lunches brought from home.  
Ending childhood hunger: a social impact analysis. February 2013.  
This social impact analysis was conducted by Deloitte to help Share Our Strength achieve its goal of ending childhood hunger No Kid Hungry. The campaign connects children in need with healthy food and teaches families how to cook affordable, nutritious meals.

 

 
Enough for All: Household Food Security in Canada, CBoC.  
All schools in all provinces and territories should provide meal programs to help their students alleviate hunger and poor nutrition and to support their performance at school, The Conference Board of Canada recommends in a new report from its Centre for Food in Canada. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
School Nutrition Programs in Canada and Asia-Pacific. 
The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) and the Social and Industrial Food Service Institute held a conference in Moscow in June 2012 to review school nutrition programs in APEC member economies, including Canada. APEC members agreed that in the context of today’s realities, which include increased food insecurity, a rise in biofuel production, and climate change challenges proper attention should be paid to school feeding. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
No Time to Wait: The Healthy Kids Strategy, from the Healthy Kids Panel. February 2013. 
Ontario’s Healthy Kids Panel has prepared this report of recommendations on how the province can bolster the promotion of health and well-being of children and youth. In this report, the Healthy Kids Panel presents a three-pronged strategy to address this, which in turn will pave the way for future health and success in Ontario by creating healthy communities. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
Feeding Our Future: The First and Second Year Evaluation. March 2012. 
Student Nutrition Programs provide over 147,000 meals to hungry students each school day with over 600 breakfast, lunch and snack programs.This report is an evaluation of the program’s implementation across seven specific sites to gain an in-depth understanding of its strengths and areas for improvement and to determine the impact of the program on student health, behaviour, attendance, attention, and achievement. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
Nourishing Young Minds Report. June 2012. 
Toronto Public Health has issued the Nourishing Young Minds report calling for Student Nutrition Programs (SNPs) in all schools across Canada’s largest city. While funding for SNPs in Toronto has grown by 52% since 2005, the number of participants has grown by 86%. The city’s medical officer of health, Dr. David McKeown, is urging a pragmatic, planned, staged and managed approach to rolling out SNPs across the city over a five year period, starting with the neediest schools Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
What a National Child Nutrition Program Would do for Canada. 
In 2009, the Centre for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) published a primer on what a national child nutrition program would do for Canada, concluding that such a program would be both consistent with the Canadian government’s political commitments and would form sound public policy. CSPI also outlines what the early stages and roll-out of a national student child program would look like. Find out more about Student Nutrition Programs here.
Childhood obesity may be affected by dish size and frequency of meals.  

New research suggests that if we diminish the size of childrens’ plates and bowls and encourage them to eat smaller meals throughout the day as opposed to three big ones, this may keep off extra weight.
  
Vision, Hearing & Health
Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative, Phase 2 Report. November 2013.
Since the opening of the first in-school health clinic in November 2010, the Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative (MSPHI) has grown noticeably between 2011 and 2013 in terms of the number of clinics opened, the neighbouring schools supported, the number of students served, and the range of health services provided.
Find out more about the Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative by clicking here.
Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative, Phase 1 Report. March 2012.
With six clinics now in operation, the Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative (MSPHI) brings health care to the place where students and families feel most comfortable: their local school. This report presents the findings from an assessment of the two first MSPHI in-school health clinics, Sprucecourt Public School and George Webster Public School.
Find out more about the Model Schools Paediatric Health Initiative by clicking here.
Poverty
The Association Between Food Insecurity and Academic Achievement in Canadian School Aged Children (2017)
Students from low-income households and those who reported poor diet quality were less likely to do well at school. The study concluded that low household insecurity is associated with poor academic achievement among Canadian school aged children. 
 
Health Care in Canada: What makes us sick?
Poverty kills. That’s the key message in What Makes Us Sick, a report released today by the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) based on what Canadians said during a series of town hall meetings and an online consultation held earlier this year. The national dialogue with Canadians asked them about their experiences with the social determinants of health – the factors that cause people to suffer poor health in the first place.