Councillor sounds alarm over how city will pay for student meals

A Toronto councillor is worried budget pressures will force the city to stop expanding a program that helps feed students in need, even as more children than ever are relying on the subsidized meals.

The city's budget committee will debate the funding for its Student Nutrition Program, on which the city spent $9.9 million last year to provide breakfast, lunch and snacks for some 194,000 students, at the committee's upcoming January meeting.

Toronto Public Health recommends spending an extra $2.2 million in 2017 so that more students can be fed through the program, budget notes state. But those same notes say the preliminary budget mentions a boost of $140,000, which would cover only the inflationary cost of food.

Read More »

CTV News Toronto’s Dana Levenson visits Dundas Public School Student Nutrition Program

A nutritious meal fuels the body and mind and it can be tough for kids to make it through the day without one. CTV News Toronto’s Dana Levenson visits Dundas Public School Student Nutrition Program.

Read More »

Hadden Family Foundation Announces Major Funding to After-School and Nutrition Programs.

TORONTO, 23 November 2016 – Thanks to a former Toronto student and his family, thousands of at-risk students are learning to cook, finishing their homework and getting fit at beyond 3:30 after-school programs and being nourished through their Feeding Hungry Minds student nutrition program.

Read More »

Toronto holds onto its shameful title: Child poverty capital of Canada

Toronto remains the child poverty capital of Canada, with 28.6 per cent of children living in very low-income households, according to a new report being released Tuesday.

Read More »

Running on empty: One in five children go to school hungry

Posted 2016-10-04
Category Nutrition

One in five children is starting their day running on empty.

Jessica B.’s children used to go to school hungry – they’re 9 and 5 years old. “The rent isn’t getting cheaper and sometimes it can be hard to make sure my kids get healthy food. I don’t want them growing up eating junk,” says Jessica, a single mom working full-time at a local store in B.C.

She starts works at 8 a.m. and time pressures can have them all rushing out the door without breakfast, and “sometimes money is too tight to make sure the fridge is full.”

Jessica’s kids aren’t alone – “there’s one million children that are at risk of going to school on an empty stomach because they live in a precarious environment,” says Daniel Germain, founding president of Breakfast Club of Canada. “They all start the day with a strike against them and they just won’t be able to fully concentrate and learn to the best of their ability.”

Read More »

Pricey fruits and veggies leading Canadians to buy frozen produce and juice

About one-quarter of respondents in a new survey say they ate fewer fruits and vegetables over the past 12 months. Slightly more than two-thirds of respondents say they passed on purchasing specific high-cost produce.

Read More »

Mayor Tory serves up free-breakfast initiative

Posted 2016-02-17
Category Nutrition

The program director at the Thorncliffe Neighbourhood Office applauds Mayor John Tory’s initiative to provide free breakfasts to Toronto-area grade school students, but believes the program doesn’t go far enough.

In 2014 the Government of Ontario released a poverty reduction strategy; it included $10 million made available between 2014 and 2019 to reduce poverty in Ontario communities. On Monday, Mayor Tory announced the allotment of $500,000 (of that $10 million) to offer breakfasts to communities in need. Mohan Doss, the program director of Thorncliffe Neighbourhood Office, appreciates the initiative, but has some criticism.

Read More »

Relationships key to kids' well-being, UBC study finds

Children’s connection with parents, friends and other grown-ups plays a greater role in their sense of well-being than how well off their families are, a study from the University of British Columbia has found. [...] It found the most significant indicators of life satisfaction and health were positive relationships with adults at home, school and in the community, and peer belonging.

Read More »

Send Us A Message

Subscribe To Our Mailing List

Find Us


2 Trethewey Drive, 4th Floor
Toronto, ON M6M 4A8

Tel: 416-394-6880
Fax: 416-394-6881

Follow Us